The Origin of Reggae Music in Depth Research

The Origin of Reggae Music in Depth Research - With Jamaica celebrating 50 years of Independence, there has been, quite understandably, a look at what has happened in the country's history.

Third World - Reggae band

That is no less true of the country's music. This year, The Gleaner has published, on a number of occasions, different aspects of that history.

In one 'Story of the Song', a weekly feature produced by Mel Cooke, Toots Hibbert spoke of first coming up with the term 'reggae'.

More recently, Edward Seaga spoke about The Heptones being responsible for the first real reggae track. The views are uncountable, but as Jamaica looks at 50 more years of Independence, we continue to look with much curiosity at our past.

THERE HAVE been various moments in history when reggae music has ruled the world. In fact, you'd probably be hard-pressed to find a part of the globe that hasn't heard of or listened to the music of Bob Marley, Shaggy or UB40.

What is perhaps lesser known is the story behind the genre's humble beginnings. But a new book is set to shed some light.

Reggae Going International 1967-1976 is the new biography of veteran reggae producer Bunny 'Striker' Lee: the Jamaican legend who still holds the noteworthy title of having the longest consecutive number one on the Jamaican charts (23 weeks) with the 1972 John Holt hit Stick By Me.

Having been in the music business for more than half a century, Lee has heard all the stories about how reggae started. But according to the Cherry Oh Baby hitmaker, many of the tales are lies.

"Everybody has given a different story of how reggae started, and they are not true," explained the 71-year-old.

"I thought it was time that people got something authentic, so they can know the real story of how reggae and Jamaican music evolved."

Getting even more specific about some of the tales he's heard, Lee went on to rubbish a widely documented story which claims that reggae singer Frederick 'Toots' Hibbert was the inventor of the term 'reggae'.

"The first reggae tune was It's Reggae Time by Don Lee. But I've heard Toots talk about the beginning of reggae when he wasn't around at that time! (At that time), he was in prison getting his number 5446 (the number that went on to inspire Toots' 1968 track 54-46 Was My Number). Most of these guys are telling fibs about reggae and who was around in the early days."

Jamaican music enthusiasts will know that there has been much speculation surrounding the origin of the word reggae, but according to Lee, it was he who coined the term.

"I was there from the beginning; we gave the music the name reggae in 1968. It came from the word 'streggae': another way to describe a prostitute. But it didn't take off because the radios wouldn't play it, so we changed it to reggae."

By the age of 27, Lee, who had started his career as a record plugger, worked his way up the industry ladder to eventually open his own record label. But it was not until the late '60s that reggae and Lee became international.

"In 1968, we took the music abroad. It was already in Jamaica, but I was taking the music further. People used to say we couldn't make it in England, but we went to the studio and we made it."

Unsung heroes

As a man who has had his fair share of fame and limelight, Lee admits that there are many people who helped to make Jamaican music dominant and says they also deserve to be remembered.

"I've been in the business for around 50-odd years. It's been a good evolution, because we didn't know reggae would last so long. There are plenty of unsung heroes in the reggae industry. They are cornerstones of the business, but they didn't step forward to be counted.

"Most of the people who helped create the music that Jamaica is known for have died, but their music lives on. We have a saying in Jamaica: 'All things shall perish from under the sky, music alone shall live.' And the music keeps getting bigger and better."

And that is exactly what the veteran hitmaker thinks about the new generation of musicians that have taken control of Jamaican music in the last decade. Far from being against the latest wave of dancehall performers, Lee is hoping they will herald a new dominance of Jamaican music.

"The new generation is carrying the baton," he says. "Things change and the music of Vybz Kartel, Mavado and others is now doing well. Artistes like that take it to another level, so our music lives on."

Source: Jamaica-gleaner.com

Return to Dancehall Reggae World homepage from The Origin Of Reggae Music In Depth Research page

Go to the Origin of Reggae Music page from here

Dancehall artiste Shenseea

Shenseea Claims "Princess Of Dancehall" Critics Hits Back

Dancehall artiste Shenseea yesterday claimed her spot among the female dancehall royalty when she dubbed herself dancehall's 'princess' in a post to her Instagram page.
The post took on a life of its own, sparking debate about which female dancehall artiste was deserving of the title princess, since Spice is the queen.Read full article here

Rygin King said Alkaline Not On his Level

Dancehall artiste Rygin King might be losing a few fans after comments he made about Alkaline, not on his level.  During a live broadcast on his Instagram Montego Bay Based artiste, Rygin King was asked if Alkaline is bigger Read more here

Jay Blaxx

Upcoming dancehall artiste Jay Blaxx was shot and killed in the community of Granville, St James on August 28, 2018.

Reports reaching us are that Jay Blaxx who is from the said community was killed by Read more here

Help us to keep Dancehall & Reggae Music Genres alive. We are asking for a small contribution to Keep our site online. CLICK HERE TO MAKE A CONTRIBUTION.

To have your Music, Video, Album, Press Releases or posted or promoted on our site [Click here to contact us for more info]

Who Is The Most Underrated Reggae Entertainer You know?

Over the years there are a lot of good Dancehall and Reggae music entertainers who has been pushed unto the back burner for some reason not of their own.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO....

New! Comments

Have your say about what you just read! Leave me a comment in the box below.

Articles On Dancehall Reggae World You Might Have Missed ......

PROMOTIONAL OPPORTUNITY

Producers, Artists, Publicist and Managers Get your  Product Out to Over 20,000 Music industry players.  Our players Include Radio Stations, Sound Systems and Deejays.  Click here to Contact Us For More detail.

Win a digital copy of "Welcome To Jamrock Digital CD" by answering the following question.

As a producer What's the name of the first album produced by Damian Jr Gong Marley on his Ghetto Youths International label?

CLICK HERE TO POST YOUR ANSWER


Rygin King ready to take dancehall throne - He has been racking up hit after hit in recent times. His songs, 'Things Go Change' and 'How Me Grow', have been creating a buzz on the local scene, igniting the dancehall space and has helped to cement the up-and-coming artiste's place on 'the ones to watch out for' list.

His name is Rygin King, and while he may be fairly new to the industry, the artiste believes he is dancehall's next 'rising king'.

Dancehall lovers have only just begun to put a name to the songs that have been burning up the streets over the past few months, but little is known about the young man behind the music; until now. Read more here

Send Your Music, Video and Press Releases to info@dancehallreggaeworld.com